Guest workers in US at all-time high

Produce growers in the United States are relying more heavily on seasonal workers, mostly from Mexico, under the H-2A visa program. Recent statistics released by the U.S. Labour Department report that for the most recent fiscal year ending September 30, the numbers are up 15 per cent to 317,619 approved applications. 

 

Together, the states of Florida, Georgia and California represent about one-third of the total according to a report from Successful Farming.  The dearth of domestic workers has resulted in more reliance on the worker program which has doubled in numbers since 2016. The sectors with the highest needs are fruit, tree nuts and vegetables. 

 

Source:  Successful Farming Magazine November 10, 2021

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Monday, November 22, 2021

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